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May 10

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: For Criminal Justice Practitioners

A history & explanation related to the overall spectrum attributed to fetal alcohol disorders. It will touch upon the recognition of ‘red flags’ and what is considered & necessary about a diagnosis. Focusing on how impactful FASD is on the justice system as a whole, & what tends to differentiate FASD from other intellectual disabilities, tips of the trade, & considerations related to policing, corrections, the courts, & probation/parole will be introduced with a heavy emphasis on recommendations of the American Bar Assoc (ABA) stemming from their standing resolution regarding Fetal Alcohol.

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May 10, 2024 12:00pm - May 10, 2024 02:30pm

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A history & explanation related to the overall spectrum attributed to fetal alcohol disorders. It will touch upon the recognition of ‘red flags’ and what is considered & necessary about a diagnosis. Focusing on how impactful FASD is on the justice system as a whole, & what tends to differentiate FASD from other intellectual disabilities, tips of the trade, & considerations related to policing, corrections, the courts, & probation/parole will be introduced with a heavy emphasis on recommendations of the American Bar Assoc (ABA) stemming from their standing resolution regarding Fetal Alcohol.

The focus of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD): For Criminal Justice Practitioners will be on a short history and explanation related to the overall spectrum attributed to fetal alcohol. It will touch briefly upon recognition of so called ‘red flags’; being the things that make you scratch your head and wonder about such things as: “He seems like he understands, but why is he refusing to do what needs done?”; “I don’t get it! Why are you playing dumb?”; “When are you going to learn? How many times do I have to punish you before your stop ______?” In conjunction with ‘red flags’, this introduction will touch upon what is considered and necessary in relation to a diagnosis; something that is unfortunately not likely to occur which in-turn oftentimes brings criminal justice practitioners into impacted persons’ lives, either as victims or offenders, thus making the caveats and ‘flags’ pertaining to FASD even more important to be recognized by justice practitioners. Focusing on how impactful FASD is on the justice system as a whole, and what tends to differentiate FASD from other intellectual disabilities, tips of the trade and considerations related to policing, corrections, the courts, and probation/parole will be introduced with heavy emphasis on recommendations of the American Bar Association (ABA) stemming from their standing resolution in regard to Fetal Alcohol.


TAKEAWAYS:

  • Basic understanding of what FASD is, how it is diagnosed, and supports needed.
  • Considerations law enforcement personnel should include during investigations with individuals affected by FASD.
  • Guidance for corrections personnel in establishing communication and routines for FASD-affected individuals.
  • Provide court personnel an awareness and understanding of FASD to take into account during sentencing for rehabilitation.


The Florida Center for Early Childhood operates the only FASD Diagnostic Clinics in the State of Florida!


Continuing Education Hours:

  • The Florida Bar Association has approved CLE Credits: General 2.5, Mental Health and Wellness 2.5; Certification Credits: Criminal Appellate Law 2.5, Criminal Trial Law 2.5. 


  • 2.5 CEs available for Florida LCSW, LMHC, LMFT, and CESW through CEBrokers. 


  • Certificates will be provided for self-reporting.

Captain Brian Holloman

Patrol Division Commander, Elkhart Sheriff’s Office


Captain Holloman has been with the Elkhart County Sheriff’s Office (ECSO) since March of 1995. He has certifications in internal affairs, CALEA/APCO accreditation management, field training, traffic crash reconstruction, computer forensics, crime analysis, and homicide investigations. He holds a Master of Criminal Justice degree from Boston University and his undergraduate studies were

completed at Ball State University where he obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice & Criminology. For fifteen (15) years, he was an adjunct faculty member in the Criminal Justice Department at Indiana Tech.

On a personal note, Captain Holloman is the father of a son who is on the fetal alcohol spectrum and as a result he is passionate about the need to educate others about the supports necessary for those on the spectrum to have the ability to succeed in life. By recognizing the needs of those on the spectrum, through both personal and professional experiences, Captain Holloman seeks out ways to educate those willing to listen on what an affected person needs and why so that the lessons he and his son had to learn over the course of fifteen undiagnosed years can be used in the hopes of improving the life potential of others like his son.